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Scholarly article re: the impact of parking requirements on Affordability

Rex

Following up on the recent spate of articles on mandating off-street parking, here in Portland and nationally, here’s a research article based on real world experience in Los Angeles:

Parking requirements as a barrier to housing development: regulation and reform in Los Angeles

Abstract: Using a partial deregulation of residential parking in downtown Los Angeles, I examine the impact of minimum parking requirements on housing development. I find that when parking requirements are removed, developers provide more housing and less parking, and also that developers provide different types of housing: housing in older buildings, in previously disinvested areas, and housing marketed toward non-drivers. This latter category of housing tends to sell for less than housing with parking spaces. The research also highlights the importance of removing not just quantity mandates but locational mandates as well. Developers in dense inner cities are often willing to provide parking, but ordinances that require parking to be on the same site as housing can be prohibitively expensive.

(Michael Manville, Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, Institute of Transportation Studies, UCLA)
Thanks to Steve Gutman for the link.

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Why Getting to 2100? The next century will be a test: can humans use their intelligence and foresight to successfully transition from our consumption-fueled economy to one that balances the needs of humans with the Earth’s available resources. Getting to 2100 aims to be a forum for sharing of good ideas and good works. Got a good example or a new idea? Share it with the world!

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