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Why Don’t Motorists Ever Get Blamed for the Mayhem They Cause?

Rex

How’s this for twisted logic? Kid gets hit by a speeding car and its the fault of other cyclists who don’t wear helmets!!! From a letter to the editor in the daily Oregonian: 

Sitting at a window seat in a downtown Corvallis restaurant, my husband and I took note of how many bicyclists and skateboarders frequent the busy streets. We were shocked at how few wore helmets, perhaps 1 in 15.

I write this while sitting at my son’s bedside in the ICU. He was riding his bike to work and was hit by a car traveling 45 mph about five weeks ago. He was thrust into the windshield, toppled onto the roof, and then hit asphalt. He wasn’t wearing a helmet. His physical damages are extensive, including the loss of a kidney, spleen and a compound fracture to his left leg. The question of whether his true self would emerge from the coma was our foremost concern.

His brain swelled, and his left side was paralyzed. He lost sight in his left eye. Two weeks later, he is regaining his left motor skills, his sight is slowly coming back, and he has a long road of physical rehabilitation ahead. — Oregonian, 8/13 2013. Name withheld.

I never understand why motorists seem to be immune from blame for the mayhem they cause. Motorists kill over 1.2 Million people every year. Its time to recognize the car as a treatable disease rather than an act of God. Lower speed limits, strict driver liability laws and defining safety from perspective of people walking and cycling are some of the “medicine” needed. No possible reason a car should travel over 20mph in an urban, non-highway setting.

Helmets, bright clothing, pedestrian airbags–I’ve heard it all as ways to make car-bike/walker crashes the fault of the victim rather than the perpetrator.

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Why Getting to 2100? The next century will be a test: can humans use their intelligence and foresight to successfully transition from our consumption-fueled economy to one that balances the needs of humans with the Earth’s available resources. Getting to 2100 aims to be a forum for sharing of good ideas and good works. Got a good example or a new idea? Share it with the world!

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